Author: Mick Pocock

This 6-part blog series explores the use of MEMS Accelerometers for vibration monitoring in construction and blasting applications, and the five most prevalent issues with these devices, as outlined in Instantel’s recent white paper, “Limitations of MEMS Accelerometers for Vibration Monitoring Systems.” Instantel’s paper concluded that, when it comes to vibration monitoring for construction and blasting applications, data from MEMS Accelerometers can be unreliable when measuring high frequency vibrations caused by explosives, heavy construction equipment, jackhammers, pile drivers and similar activities. The paper outlined five major concerns, including:  Vibration Rectification Error...

This 6-part blog series explores the use of MEMS Accelerometers for vibration monitoring in construction and blasting applications, and the five most prevalent issues with these devices, as outlined in Instantel’s recent white paper, “Limitations of MEMS Accelerometers for Vibration Monitoring Systems.” Instantel’s paper concluded that, when it comes to vibration monitoring for construction and blasting applications, data from MEMS Accelerometers can be unreliable when measuring high frequency vibrations caused by explosives, heavy construction equipment, jackhammers, pile drivers and similar activities. The paper outlined five major concerns, including: Vibration Rectification Error...

This 6-part blog series explores the use of MEMS Accelerometers for vibration monitoring in construction and blasting applications, and the five most prevalent issues with these devices, as outlined in Instantel’s recent white paper, “Limitations of MEMS Accelerometers for Vibration Monitoring Systems.” Instantel’s paper concluded that, when it comes to vibration monitoring for construction and blasting applications, data from MEMS Accelerometers can be unreliable when measuring high frequency vibrations caused by explosives, heavy construction equipment, jackhammers, pile drivers and similar activities. The paper outlined five major concerns, including:  Vibration Rectification Error...

In the first part of this 6-blog series, we introduced Instantel’s white paper (Limitations of MEMS Accelerometers for Vibration Monitoring Systems) that presented research comparing current Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Accelerometers against traditional solenoid geophone sensors. The paper concluded that, when it comes to vibration monitoring for industrial, construction and blasting applications, data from MEMS Accelerometers can be erroneous due to the frequency and amplitude of the vibrations being recorded, and are particularly unreliable when measuring high frequency vibrations caused by explosives, heavy construction equipment, jackhammers, pile drivers and the like.   In...

Monitoring vibrations at construction, mining and blasting sites is crucial to prevent damage to property and structures, and to comply with local, state and federal regulations. When it comes to the equipment used to measure the vibrations created by these activities, users have several options from which to choose.  Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Accelerometers While traditional vibration monitoring devices utilize geophone sensors, we have come across some new, less experienced manufacturers who are touting Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers as the modern replacement for the geophones. Those who promote MEMS accelerometers for the construction and...

Overview Using an Automated Motorized Total Station (AMTS) to track the progress or performance of a project design, or to monitor structures that are already in place, has many advantages… as long as the equipment is set up and positioned correctly. There are a few common issues, however, that tend to arise with the use of this type of automated land surveying equipment. These issues can typically be  minimized  or  prevented  by adhering to a few basic configuration guidelines for both the AMTS and its associated software. To get the best...

COVID-19 has presented many challenges for the construction industry, and many doubt it will ever be the same again. Practices such as social distancing and working from home are likely to continue beyond this epidemic, as the industry seeks to mitigate future risk to people and projects. Considerations Externals Contractors Will be Taking Moving Forward As an external contractor, what considerations must be taken when facing this new future? Paul Pickering from Aeroqual discusses the possible challenges in his recent post. To summarize: Physical interactions are likely to be limited between company employees and...